Lucius Fox

Chief Executive Officer of Wayne Enterprises

fastcompany:

John Nelson’s infographic, “Five Years of Traffic Fatalities,” comprises charts and maps made with little more than Excel spreadsheets.

Posted at 2:45pm and tagged with: Infographic, Data Visualization, Traffic, John Nelson, Data, Statistics,.

fastcompany:

John Nelson’s infographic, “Five Years of Traffic Fatalities,” comprises charts and maps made with little more than Excel spreadsheets.

wildcat2030:

This is the author’s cat. This cat is not dead

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As he muses about his mortality, statistician Prof David Spiegelhalter wonders if he is destined to live longer than his 20-year-old cat. Our cat is old. Old, deaf and a bit daft. But, as I steadily head that way myself, I’ve started to consider him as a role model. He’s over 20, and in the recent unseasonable sunshine has taken to lying corpse-like on the pavement. In a feeble impersonation of Schrodinger’s cat, he could be either alive or dead, and the only way to find out is to prod him, as he doesn’t respond to shouting. Last week, he took to doing his death act on top of a bin, and so it looked like he had just been thrown out with the rubbish. He got kidnapped by a concerned cat lover and carted off to the local Blue Cross, and we had to go and bail him out. Taking each cat year as seven human years makes him over 140 - twice the human three-score-years-and-10 Biblical use-by date. I recently “celebrated” my 59th birthday, which is only around eight cat years and so a relative youth. (via BBC News - Will I live longer than my cat?)

Pardon me for saying so, Harleen, but this cat somewhat reminded me of yours.

Posted at 12:58pm and tagged with: statistics, longevity,.

wildcat2030:

This is the author’s cat. This cat is not dead
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As he muses about his mortality, statistician Prof David Spiegelhalter wonders if he is destined to live longer than his 20-year-old cat. Our cat is old. Old, deaf and a bit daft. But, as I steadily head that way myself, I’ve started to consider him as a role model. He’s over 20, and in the recent unseasonable sunshine has taken to lying corpse-like on the pavement. In a feeble impersonation of Schrodinger’s cat, he could be either alive or dead, and the only way to find out is to prod him, as he doesn’t respond to shouting. Last week, he took to doing his death act on top of a bin, and so it looked like he had just been thrown out with the rubbish. He got kidnapped by a concerned cat lover and carted off to the local Blue Cross, and we had to go and bail him out. Taking each cat year as seven human years makes him over 140 - twice the human three-score-years-and-10 Biblical use-by date. I recently “celebrated” my 59th birthday, which is only around eight cat years and so a relative youth. (via BBC News - Will I live longer than my cat?)

Pardon me for saying so, Harleen, but this cat somewhat reminded me of yours.

(Source: hbr.org)

Posted at 9:07am and tagged with: Employment, Work, Occupations, Jobs, Careers, Stress, Statistics,.

5 graphs and 4 photos tell the story on obesity, diabetes & walking

“Perhaps the single most alarming public health trend in the United States today is the dramatic rise in overweight and obesity, bringing serious risks of heart disease, diabetes and other consequences leading to life impairment and premature death.  This is bad enough as it is, but I contend that it is particularly unfortunate that we do not sufficiently recognize the extent to which these trends are caused by environmental factors, particularly the shape of our built environment.” - Kaid Benfield, NRDC’s director of sustainable communities.

via obon:

Posted at 11:20am and tagged with: Infographics, Charts, Statistics, Centers for Disease Control, Diabetes, Obesity, Exercise, Infrastructure,.


5 graphs and 4 photos tell the story on obesity, diabetes & walking

“Perhaps the single most alarming public health trend in the United States today is the dramatic rise in overweight and obesity, bringing serious risks of heart disease, diabetes and other consequences leading to life impairment and premature death.  This is bad enough as it is, but I contend that it is particularly unfortunate that we do not sufficiently recognize the extent to which these trends are caused by environmental factors, particularly the shape of our built environment.” - Kaid Benfield, NRDC’s director of sustainable communities.
via obon:

(Source: hbr.org)

Posted at 2:36pm and tagged with: Business, Behavior, Human Resources, Productivity, Statistics,.

We’ve made the point time and time again that charts and graphs, though they feel official and true, can lie. Rarely do you get to see that at work, but the good folks at Hyperakt have sent us a prime case study in infographic deception. The subject, of course, is politics—and in particular, the raging debate over whether the rich should be made to pay more taxes. “Using the same data, very different stories can be told depending on different agendas,” says Deroy Peraza, one of the founders of Hyperakt.

A story from the Wall Street Journal’s far-right op-ed page gets us started, with a chart showing how much taxable income is made by Americans ranging from the rich to poor:

Looking at that, the conclusion seems glaringly obvious: The rich don’t make so much money! In fact, as a group, they seem to make about as much as the poorest Americans! Why on earth would you tax these poor souls? As Jonathan Chait points out:

The chart most certainly does not demonstrate the Journal’s point. It instead relies upon an optical illusion. Democrats have been arguing that their tax increases should solely effect income over $250,000 a year. The Journal makes that pot of income appear small by diving it up into seven different lines. See, the $100,000-$200,000 line is tall, and all the other lines to the right of it are short. That tall line must be where the money is!

Posted at 1:31pm and tagged with: Infographics, Data, Statistics, Data Visualization,.

After 30 years of greed being good and rising tides lifting all boats, inequality — or “class warfare,” if you prefer — is back on the political agenda.

The Occupiers who camped out in central squares from Melbourne to Oakland, denouncing the “1 percent” for its supposedly ill-gotten gains, have a point: Inequality is out of control. But these mainly middle-class complainers are an incredibly coddled bunch by any international reckoning. This is good news, because we’re going to need to tax them more if we’re ever going to solve the world’s real inequality problem: the estimated 900 million people who live on less than $1.25 a day.

(Source: hbr.org)

Posted at 10:54am and tagged with: Occupy Wall Street, Statistics, Economy, Economics, United States, US, Developed Countries, Global Economy, Occupiers, Middle Class, Equality,.


After 30 years of greed being good and rising tides lifting all boats, inequality — or “class warfare,” if you prefer — is back on the political agenda.
The Occupiers who camped out in central squares from Melbourne to Oakland, denouncing the “1 percent” for its supposedly ill-gotten gains, have a point: Inequality is out of control. But these mainly middle-class complainers are an incredibly coddled bunch by any international reckoning. This is good news, because we’re going to need to tax them more if we’re ever going to solve the world’s real inequality problem: the estimated 900 million people who live on less than $1.25 a day.