Lucius Fox

Chief Executive Officer of Wayne Enterprises

President BARACK OBAMA, to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta prior to the State of the Union speech.  Earlier, Panetta had overseen the rescue operation of an American woman and a Danish national who were part of a relief organization in Somalia: they had been kidnapped and held for ransom by Somali pirates, nine of whom were killed in Wednesday’s firefight with U.S. soldiers.

Andrew Sullivan used the term “badass” to describe our president.  He continues to be just that.

(via inothernews)

Posted at 10:52am and tagged with: SecDef, Leon Panetta, Secretary Leon Panetta, Department of Defense, DOD, US, United States, President Barack H. Obama, State of the Union, Somalia,.

Leon. Good job tonight. Good job tonight.

theatlantic:

nationalpost:

State of the Union 2012: Breaking down the language

The National Post’s graphics team looks at key words and how many times they’ve been used in State of the Union addresses going back to 2001:

Fascinating!

Posted at 10:49am and tagged with: Politics, US, State of the Union, United States, President George W. Bush, President Barack H. Obama, Charts, Semantics,.

theatlantic:

nationalpost:

State of the Union 2012: Breaking down the language
The National Post’s graphics team looks at key words and how many times they’ve been used in State of the Union addresses going back to 2001:

Fascinating!

todaysdocument:

President Franklin Roosevelt delivered his “Four Freedoms” speech on January 6, 1941, named for his ”four essential human freedoms,”: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. As America became engaged in World War II, painter Norman Rockwell did a series of paintings illustrating the four freedoms as international goals that went beyond just defeating the Axis powers.

Posted at 11:30am and tagged with: History, 1940s, FDR, Four Freedoms, Franklin Roosevelt, Norman Rockwell, State of the Union, World War II, presidential address,.

todaysdocument:

President Franklin Roosevelt delivered his “Four Freedoms” speech on January 6, 1941, named for his ”four essential human freedoms,”:  freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. As America became engaged in World War II, painter Norman Rockwell did a series of paintings illustrating the four freedoms as international goals that went beyond just defeating the Axis powers.