Lucius Fox

Chief Executive Officer of Wayne Enterprises

riversidearchives:

Finding a Civilian Personnel File

In her hunt for details relating to Loyd’s short life, our archivist knew to look for a Civilian Personnel File, since Loyd was a federal employee.  She contacted the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis (NPRC), and they were able to locate his records.  This gave her much more information about his life.

Loyd was hired by the General Land Office on 4/18/1916.  This application form confirmed my findings about his graduation from Yuma County High School.  It also told me that he went to the University of Colorado at Boulder after high school. 

As part of our ongoing efforts to help the public conduct successful research, we at the National Archives at Riverside occasionally share the research methodologies of our staff, researchers, and citizen archivists.  This post is part of a series of posts related to the research of one of our former archivists, Monique, into the life of a man named Loyd Sechrist.  Sechrist conducted surveys of Arizona immediately after statehood for the Bureau of Land Management, and records related to his life (and death) caught Monique’s curiosity.   Follow the story of Monique’s research into the history of this man here on Tumblr with the tag #Loyd Sechrist, and on our archives’ Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/nationalarchivesriverside.

Posted at 2:23pm and tagged with: Loyd Sechrist, research, history, genealogy, National Archives, 1910s, vintage,.

riversidearchives:

Finding a Civilian Personnel File
In her hunt for details relating to Loyd’s short life, our archivist knew to look for a Civilian Personnel File, since Loyd was a federal employee.  She contacted the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis (NPRC), and they were able to locate his records.  This gave her much more information about his life.
Loyd was hired by the General Land Office on 4/18/1916.  This application form confirmed my findings about his graduation from Yuma County High School.  It also told me that he went to the University of Colorado at Boulder after high school. 
As part of our ongoing efforts to help the public conduct successful research, we at the National Archives at Riverside occasionally share the research methodologies of our staff, researchers, and citizen archivists.  This post is part of a series of posts related to the research of one of our former archivists, Monique, into the life of a man named Loyd Sechrist.  Sechrist conducted surveys of Arizona immediately after statehood for the Bureau of Land Management, and records related to his life (and death) caught Monique’s curiosity.   Follow the story of Monique’s research into the history of this man here on Tumblr with the tag #Loyd Sechrist, and on our archives’ Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/nationalarchivesriverside.

aotus:

Until fairly recently, social media has been seen as experimental and outside the realm of the essential work of our agency. Today that is simply no longer the case.  Smart use of social media is now mission-critical to our agency.

Today, it is no longer about a single voice disseminating information from the Archives. Our customers want deeper access to our staff and to hear the entire chorus of our voices.  Our citizen archivists and engaged customers eagerly await more ways to participate and add their voices to the chorus.  Together we can provide greater access to the records, and a deeper understanding of those records. Together we’ll amplify each other’s messages.

Let’s do it!

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

Posted at 11:20am and tagged with: National Archives, opengov, social media, citizen archivist, crowdsourcing,.

aotus:

Until fairly recently, social media has been seen as experimental and outside the realm of the essential work of our agency. Today that is simply no longer the case.  Smart use of social media is now mission-critical to our agency.
Today, it is no longer about a single voice disseminating information from the Archives. Our customers want deeper access to our staff and to hear the entire chorus of our voices.  Our citizen archivists and engaged customers eagerly await more ways to participate and add their voices to the chorus.  Together we can provide greater access to the records, and a deeper understanding of those records. Together we’ll amplify each other’s messages.
Let’s do it!
Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

todaysdocument:

150 Years of the DC Emancipation Act

In celebration of the 150th anniversary of the DC Emancipation Act, the National Archives has released this short documentary video. Archivists discusses the petitions filed by owners and enslaved persons; how the process worked, and how the University of Nebraska’s new website, Civil War Washington (www.civilwardc.org) will make the petitions available to researchers.

Posted at 12:42pm and tagged with: slavery, emancipation, Washington DC, Civil War, CW150, National Archives,.

congressarchives:

Today the National Archives launched the 1940 Census online. This is the first time the census has ever been available online in its entirety!

The first census was taken in 1790, and has continued to be conducted every 10 years. Until 1840, Federal judges and marshals throughout the U.S. administered the census. In 1840, Congress passed the Census Act which created a central office for the census that opened and closed for each counting. Finally in 1902, Congress passed this act creating a permanent Census Office within the Federal government.

H.R. 198, a bill to establish a permanent Census Bureau, 12/2/1901, HR57A-B1, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives

Posted at 11:18am and tagged with: 1940 Census, Census, congress, National Archives, history,.

congressarchives:

Today the National Archives launched the 1940 Census online. This is the first time the census has ever been available online in its entirety!
The first census was taken in 1790, and has continued to be conducted every 10 years. Until 1840, Federal judges and marshals throughout the U.S. administered the census. In 1840, Congress passed the Census Act which created a central office for the census that opened and closed for each counting. Finally in 1902, Congress passed this act creating a permanent Census Office within the Federal government.
H.R. 198, a bill to establish a permanent Census Bureau, 12/2/1901, HR57A-B1, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives