Lucius Fox

Chief Executive Officer of Wayne Enterprises

n-a-s-a:

Venus’ Once Molten Surface

Image Credit: E. De Jong et al. (JPL), MIPL, Magellan Team, NASA

Posted at 2:45pm and tagged with: Science, Astronomy, Solar System, Venus, NASA, JPL, MIPL, Magellan,.

n-a-s-a:

Venus’ Once Molten Surface
Image Credit: E. De Jong et al. (JPL), MIPL, Magellan Team, NASA

expose-the-light:

Two Moons In Passing

In the image: Animation of Tethys passing in front of Dione from Cassini’s point of view.

Saturn’s moon Tethys passes in front of its slightly larger sister Dione in this animation made from 25 raw images acquired by Cassini on March 14, 2012. Pretty cool!

Tethys and Dione are similar in diameter, being 1,062 kilometers (660 miles) wide and 1,123 kilometers (698 miles) wide, respectively. Both are heavily cratered, ice-rich worlds.

In this view, Tethys’ enormous Odysseus crater can be seen on its northern hemisphere. 400 km (250 miles) across, Odysseus is two-fifths the diameter of Tethys itself, suggesting that it was created early in the moon’s history when it was still partially molten — or else the impact would have shattered the moon apart entirely.

The more extensively-cratered trailing side of Dione is visible here, its signature “wispy lines“ rotated out of view. Since it makes sense that a moon’s leading face should be more heavily cratered, it’s thought that Dione has been spun around by an impact event in the distant past.

If you look closely, a slight rotation in Tethys can also be discerned from the first frame to the last.

Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI. Animation by Jason Major.

Posted at 3:42pm and tagged with: Lunar, Moon, Satellite, Tethys, Dione, Cassini, Saturn, Solar System, Space, Astronomy, NASA, JPL, SSI,.

expose-the-light:

Two Moons In Passing
In the image: Animation of Tethys passing in front of Dione from Cassini’s point of view.
Saturn’s moon Tethys passes in front of its slightly larger sister Dione in this animation made from 25 raw images acquired by Cassini on March 14, 2012. Pretty cool!
Tethys and Dione are similar in diameter, being 1,062 kilometers (660 miles) wide and 1,123 kilometers (698 miles) wide, respectively. Both are heavily cratered, ice-rich worlds.
In this view, Tethys’ enormous Odysseus crater can be seen on its northern hemisphere. 400 km (250 miles) across, Odysseus is two-fifths the diameter of Tethys itself, suggesting that it was created early in the moon’s history when it was still partially molten — or else the impact would have shattered the moon apart entirely.
The more extensively-cratered trailing side of Dione is visible here, its signature “wispy lines“ rotated out of view. Since it makes sense that a moon’s leading face should be more heavily cratered, it’s thought that Dione has been spun around by an impact event in the distant past.
If you look closely, a slight rotation in Tethys can also be discerned from the first frame to the last.
Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI. Animation by Jason Major.

n-a-s-a:

Dwarf Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

Credit: Leigh Jenkins, Ann Hornschemeier (Goddard Space Flight Center) et al., JPL-Caltech, SDSS, NASA 

Posted at 1:30pm and tagged with: NASA, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Coma Cluster, JPL, JPL-Caltech, Caltech, SDSS, Goddard Space Flight Center, Space, Science,.

n-a-s-a:

Dwarf Galaxies in the Coma Cluster 
Credit: Leigh Jenkins, Ann Hornschemeier (Goddard Space Flight Center) et al., JPL-Caltech, SDSS, NASA 

n-a-s-a:

The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared

Credit: R. Kennicutt (Steward Obs.) et al., SSC, JPL, Caltech, NASA 

Posted at 10:12am and tagged with: NASA, JPL, Caltech, SSC, Science, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space, Sombrero Galaxy,.

n-a-s-a:

The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared 
Credit: R. Kennicutt (Steward Obs.) et al., SSC, JPL, Caltech, NASA 

n-a-s-a:

Attacking Mars

Credit: M. Di Lorenzo et al., Mars Exploration Rover Mission, Cornell U., JPL, NASA 

Posted at 1:56pm and tagged with: Mars, Mars Exploration Rover Mission, NASA, JPL, Cornell University, Astronomy, Space, Science, Robotics, Technology, Computing,.

n-a-s-a:

Attacking Mars 
Credit: M. Di Lorenzo et al., Mars Exploration Rover Mission, Cornell U., JPL, NASA 

n-a-s-a:

Saturn: Light, Dark, and Strange

Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA 

Posted at 1:42pm and tagged with: Astronomy, NASA, Space, Science, Saturn, The Solar System, Cassini, ISS, JPL, ESA,.

n-a-s-a:

Saturn: Light, Dark, and Strange
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA