Lucius Fox

Chief Executive Officer of Wayne Enterprises

theeconomist:

A few months ago we challenged designers to illustrate our report examining how tablet computers are changing the news business. Congratulations to our three winners, whose infographics are published on the visual.ly blog.

Posted at 11:15am and tagged with: Infographics, Data Visualization, Computing, Tablet Computers, Technology,.

sunfoundation:

Follow the money from big Dem donors to super PACs to races

Big money won big on Election Day. That is, big money supporting Democrats.

In this year’s campaign, many wealthy individuals and groups with large campaign coffers were involved — directly with contributions to candidates or indirectly through outside spending. Sunlight decided to zero in on five mega-donors who gave the most to super PACs backing liberal candidates.

Check out the House and Presidential races.

Posted at 4:30pm and tagged with: Sunlight Foundation, Kat Lucero, Visualization, Infographics, Super PACs, Politics, Washington DC, Transparency, Open Government, D3.js, Election 2012, News, Democrats, Bob Lannon,.

sunfoundation:

Follow the money from big Dem donors to super PACs to races

Big money won big on Election Day. That is, big money supporting Democrats.
In this year’s campaign, many wealthy individuals and groups with large campaign coffers were involved — directly with contributions to candidates or indirectly through outside spending. Sunlight decided to zero in on five mega-donors who gave the most to super PACs backing liberal candidates.

Check out the House and Presidential races.

fastcompany:

Last year, the comic/blog XKCD had the Internet examine various colors and name them. They ended up with a sample size of 5,000,000, and designer Stephen Von Worley turned the 2,000 most common responses into a gender-exploring interactive infographic. As it seemingly turns out, men and women call the same colors different names.

Hat tip: Flowing Data

Posted at 9:28am and tagged with: Data Visualization, Infographics, Gender, Color, Science, Research,.

fastcompany:

Last year, the comic/blog XKCD had the Internet examine various colors and name them. They ended up with a sample size of 5,000,000, and designer Stephen Von Worley turned the 2,000 most common responses into a gender-exploring interactive infographic. As it seemingly turns out, men and women call the same colors different names.Hat tip: Flowing Data

npr:

discoverynews:

It’s Friday night! Perhaps you have need of a bottle of wine for a nice evening out (or in)?  Don’t fret. We at the Discovery News tumblr page have found a way to help you pick. If it looks complicated, that’s because it is.

3wbutorin:

Infografica dedicata al vino

Good luck with this. — tanya b.

Posted at 11:29am and tagged with: Wine, Infographics, Data, Sommelier, Oenology,.

npr:

discoverynews:

It’s Friday night! Perhaps you have need of a bottle of wine for a nice evening out (or in)?  Don’t fret. We at the Discovery News tumblr page have found a way to help you pick. If it looks complicated, that’s because it is.
3wbutorin:

Infografica dedicata al vino


Good luck with this. — tanya b.

journo-geekery:

How Google Collected Data From Wi-Fi Networks - Graphic - NYT

Notable:

  • The bottom-left point about geolocating routers is fascinating, considering costs and speed but how ‘fixed’ are routers given their shoddy shelf-life?
  • For those who don’t password-protect their wifi signals, I’m curious if there’s a change in content captured and if *google* would be curious about it (also, wouldn’t it be polluted by neighboring freeloaders?)

Posted at 8:39am and tagged with: New York Times, Google, Wifi, Visualization, Infographics,.

journo-geekery:

How Google Collected Data From Wi-Fi Networks - Graphic - NYT
Notable:
The bottom-left point about geolocating routers is fascinating, considering costs and speed but how ‘fixed’ are routers given their shoddy shelf-life?
For those who don’t password-protect their wifi signals, I’m curious if there’s a change in content captured and if *google* would be curious about it (also, wouldn’t it be polluted by neighboring freeloaders?)

5 graphs and 4 photos tell the story on obesity, diabetes & walking

“Perhaps the single most alarming public health trend in the United States today is the dramatic rise in overweight and obesity, bringing serious risks of heart disease, diabetes and other consequences leading to life impairment and premature death.  This is bad enough as it is, but I contend that it is particularly unfortunate that we do not sufficiently recognize the extent to which these trends are caused by environmental factors, particularly the shape of our built environment.” - Kaid Benfield, NRDC’s director of sustainable communities.

via obon:

Posted at 11:20am and tagged with: Infographics, Charts, Statistics, Centers for Disease Control, Diabetes, Obesity, Exercise, Infrastructure,.


5 graphs and 4 photos tell the story on obesity, diabetes & walking

“Perhaps the single most alarming public health trend in the United States today is the dramatic rise in overweight and obesity, bringing serious risks of heart disease, diabetes and other consequences leading to life impairment and premature death.  This is bad enough as it is, but I contend that it is particularly unfortunate that we do not sufficiently recognize the extent to which these trends are caused by environmental factors, particularly the shape of our built environment.” - Kaid Benfield, NRDC’s director of sustainable communities.
via obon:

sunfoundation:

How We Pay Taxes: 11 Charts

I’ll come right out and say it: Taxes are awesome.

Yes, awesome. If you care about national values, or the relationship of citizens to their government, or the way we choose to award and discourage behavior, there is nowhere better to start than the gnarled and fascinating world of levies and tax breaks. Tax week gives American families a reason to consider moving to Bermunda, but it also gives me an excuse to spend the day finding my favorite, most controversial, and most illuminating graphs about taxes. Here they are. If you’ve think I’ve picked the wrong ones, or if you’ve got a better chart yourself, leave it in the comment section. I’m rounding up your favorite tax graphs tomorrow.

Posted at 5:56pm and tagged with: Taxes, Tax Day, Governmnt, VisualizationI, Infographics, The Atlantic,.

lmdesigngrp:

Level of freedom and democracy in the Middle East and North African countries

Posted at 2:36pm and tagged with: infographics, Visualization, Design, Africa, Middle East, Democracry,.

lmdesigngrp:
Level of freedom and democracy in the Middle East and North African countries

theatlantic:

The Very Real Economic Dangers of an Aging America

In the future, U.S. growth will be slower. Recessions will be deeper. Recoveries will be weaker. And there’s exactly one thing to blame.

Demographics.

That’s the stark conclusion from James Stock and Mark Watson in this fascinating, and occasionally depressing, new paper. In fact, they say, the future is now. For the last few years, we’ve weathered the beginning of what demographers have called the grey tsunami. “Most of the slow recovery [in today’s job market] is attributable to a long-term slowdown in trend employment growth,” Stock and Watson write.

The authors blame two demographic demons for our uncertain future: (1) the plateau in the female labor force participation rate, and (2) the aging of the U.S. workforce. Their underlying logic is that without continued growth in female workers or a significant boost in population, employment and GDP growth will slow, leaving us vulnerable to recessions with “steeper declines and slower recoveries.” In such a future, jobless recoveries will be the only recoveries we know.

Read more. [Image: Peter Bell, Ryan Morris]

Posted at 3:42pm and tagged with: Aging, United States, Econonmy, Charts, infographics, The Atlantic,.

theatlantic:

The Very Real Economic Dangers of an Aging America

In the future, U.S. growth will be slower. Recessions will be deeper. Recoveries will be weaker. And there’s exactly one thing to blame.
Demographics.
That’s the stark conclusion from James Stock and Mark Watson in this fascinating, and occasionally depressing, new paper. In fact, they say, the future is now. For the last few years, we’ve weathered the beginning of what demographers have called the grey tsunami. “Most of the slow recovery [in today’s job market] is attributable to a long-term slowdown in trend employment growth,” Stock and Watson write.
The authors blame two demographic demons for our uncertain future: (1) the plateau in the female labor force participation rate, and (2) the aging of the U.S. workforce. Their underlying logic is that without continued growth in female workers or a significant boost in population, employment and GDP growth will slow, leaving us vulnerable to recessions with “steeper declines and slower recoveries.” In such a future, jobless recoveries will be the only recoveries we know.
Read more. [Image: Peter Bell, Ryan Morris]