Lucius Fox

Chief Executive Officer of Wayne Enterprises

fastcompany:

Last year, the comic/blog XKCD had the Internet examine various colors and name them. They ended up with a sample size of 5,000,000, and designer Stephen Von Worley turned the 2,000 most common responses into a gender-exploring interactive infographic. As it seemingly turns out, men and women call the same colors different names.

Hat tip: Flowing Data

Posted at 9:28am and tagged with: Data Visualization, Infographics, Gender, Color, Science, Research,.

fastcompany:

Last year, the comic/blog XKCD had the Internet examine various colors and name them. They ended up with a sample size of 5,000,000, and designer Stephen Von Worley turned the 2,000 most common responses into a gender-exploring interactive infographic. As it seemingly turns out, men and women call the same colors different names.Hat tip: Flowing Data

theatlantic:

The Worldwide Gender Gap for Work in 1 Graph

The triumph of women in the American office place has been perhaps the greatest economic story of the last century. In 1900, only 19 percent of women participated in the labor force. In 112 years, that number has tripled, and just a few years ago, there were more officially employed women than men in the United States.

But the rise of working women has been much slower around the world. Here’s a graph, via the International Labor Organization, comparing the gap between youth male and female participation rates around the world in 1991, 2001, and 2011. Worldwide, the gap has barely budged. In South Asia, it’s still terribly high. In East Asia, the gap is totally inverted. 

What’s going on here?

Read more. [Image: International Labor Organization]

Posted at 5:13pm and tagged with: Jobs, Gender, Charts, Women's rights, Labor, Gender gap,.

theatlantic:

The Worldwide Gender Gap for Work in 1 Graph

The triumph of women in the American office place has been perhaps the greatest economic story of the last century. In 1900, only 19 percent of women participated in the labor force. In 112 years, that number has tripled, and just a few years ago, there were more officially employed women than men in the United States.
But the rise of working women has been much slower around the world. Here’s a graph, via the International Labor Organization, comparing the gap between youth male and female participation rates around the world in 1991, 2001, and 2011. Worldwide, the gap has barely budged. In South Asia, it’s still terribly high. In East Asia, the gap is totally inverted. 
What’s going on here?
Read more. [Image: International Labor Organization]

scipsy:

The World Economic Forum released their 2011 Global Gender Gap Report:

[…] a framework for capturing the magnitude and scope of gender-based disparities and tracking their progress. The Index benchmarks national gender gaps on economic, political, education and health-based criteria, and provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups, and over time. The rankings are designed to create greater awareness among a global audience of the challenges posed by gender gaps and the opportunities created by reducing them.

The best 20?

  1.  Iceland
  2.  Norway
  3.  Finland
  4.  Sweden
  5.  Ireland
  6.  New Zealand
  7.  Denmark
  8.  Philippines
  9.  Lesotho
  10.  Switzerland
  11.  Germany
  12.  Spain
  13.  Belgium
  14.  South Africa
  15.  Netherlands
  16.  United Kingdom
  17.  United States
  18.  Canada
  19.  Latvia
  20.  Cuba
Compared to the last year, the top 10 nations remain in the same position (except for Philippines and Lesotho that switched position). United States was 19°, United Kingdom was 15° and Germany was 13°. Italy, where I live, is 74° this year, the same of last year (at least we are not worse).

Posted at 9:14pm and tagged with: Global Gender Gap, Gender, World Economic Forum, Statistics,.