Lucius Fox

Chief Executive Officer of Wayne Enterprises

theatlantic:

Why the Internet Is About to Replace TV as the Most Important Source of News

The headline conclusion of Pew’s latest monster survey of the media landscape was the demise of TV news. “There are now signs that television news is increasingly vulnerable,” the authors wrote, “as it may be losing its hold on the next generation of news consumers.”

But the larger story is the rise of the Web, which has surpassed newspapers and radio to become the second most popular source of news for Americans, after TV. 

Read more. [Image: Pew]

Posted at 7:25am and tagged with: Media, News, Charts, Journalism, Tech, Internet,.

theatlantic:

Why the Internet Is About to Replace TV as the Most Important Source of News

The headline conclusion of Pew’s latest monster survey of the media landscape was the demise of TV news. “There are now signs that television news is increasingly vulnerable,” the authors wrote, “as it may be losing its hold on the next generation of news consumers.”
But the larger story is the rise of the Web, which has surpassed newspapers and radio to become the second most popular source of news for Americans, after TV. 

Read more. [Image: Pew]

sunfoundation:

Romney surging, but Obama well ahead in campaign cash

For Mitt Romney, the magic number is $158 million. That’s how much he’ll have to outraise President Barack Obama over the last four months of the campaign to surpass the president, the record holder for campaign fundraising.

Obama’s advantage has been lost in media reports highighting the Republican nominee’s $106 million June haul. Even Obama’s campaign, including the president himself, has downplayed its financial advantage when it warns of being outspent by Romney and the Republican National Committee. For that to happen, Romney would have to best Obama by $39.5 million a month for each of the last four months of the campaign, which is $5 million more than the advantage Romney had in June.

An analysis of Federal Election Commission (FEC) disclosure reports starting when Obama and Romney formally disclosed their candidacies running through the end of May 2012, and adding in totals the campaigns have announced for June, shows that Obama and his affiliated groups have raised $552.5 million, compared to Romney’s $394.9 million.

Posted at 7:13am and tagged with: 2012, Mitt Romney, Barack Obama, POTUS, Fundraising, Open Government, Sunlight Foundation, Visualization, Charts, Dataviz, FEC, Federal Election Commission,.

sunfoundation:

Romney surging, but Obama well ahead in campaign cash

For Mitt Romney, the magic number is $158 million. That’s how much he’ll have to outraise President Barack Obama over the last four months of the campaign to surpass the president, the record holder for campaign fundraising.
Obama’s advantage has been lost in media reports highighting the Republican nominee’s $106 million June haul. Even Obama’s campaign, including the president himself, has downplayed its financial advantage when it warns of being outspent by Romney and the Republican National Committee. For that to happen, Romney would have to best Obama by $39.5 million a month for each of the last four months of the campaign, which is $5 million more than the advantage Romney had in June.
An analysis of Federal Election Commission (FEC) disclosure reports starting when Obama and Romney formally disclosed their candidacies running through the end of May 2012, and adding in totals the campaigns have announced for June, shows that Obama and his affiliated groups have raised $552.5 million, compared to Romney’s $394.9 million.

theatlantic:

The Worldwide Gender Gap for Work in 1 Graph

The triumph of women in the American office place has been perhaps the greatest economic story of the last century. In 1900, only 19 percent of women participated in the labor force. In 112 years, that number has tripled, and just a few years ago, there were more officially employed women than men in the United States.

But the rise of working women has been much slower around the world. Here’s a graph, via the International Labor Organization, comparing the gap between youth male and female participation rates around the world in 1991, 2001, and 2011. Worldwide, the gap has barely budged. In South Asia, it’s still terribly high. In East Asia, the gap is totally inverted. 

What’s going on here?

Read more. [Image: International Labor Organization]

Posted at 5:13pm and tagged with: Jobs, Gender, Charts, Women's rights, Labor, Gender gap,.

theatlantic:

The Worldwide Gender Gap for Work in 1 Graph

The triumph of women in the American office place has been perhaps the greatest economic story of the last century. In 1900, only 19 percent of women participated in the labor force. In 112 years, that number has tripled, and just a few years ago, there were more officially employed women than men in the United States.
But the rise of working women has been much slower around the world. Here’s a graph, via the International Labor Organization, comparing the gap between youth male and female participation rates around the world in 1991, 2001, and 2011. Worldwide, the gap has barely budged. In South Asia, it’s still terribly high. In East Asia, the gap is totally inverted. 
What’s going on here?
Read more. [Image: International Labor Organization]

5 graphs and 4 photos tell the story on obesity, diabetes & walking

“Perhaps the single most alarming public health trend in the United States today is the dramatic rise in overweight and obesity, bringing serious risks of heart disease, diabetes and other consequences leading to life impairment and premature death.  This is bad enough as it is, but I contend that it is particularly unfortunate that we do not sufficiently recognize the extent to which these trends are caused by environmental factors, particularly the shape of our built environment.” - Kaid Benfield, NRDC’s director of sustainable communities.

via obon:

Posted at 11:20am and tagged with: Infographics, Charts, Statistics, Centers for Disease Control, Diabetes, Obesity, Exercise, Infrastructure,.


5 graphs and 4 photos tell the story on obesity, diabetes & walking

“Perhaps the single most alarming public health trend in the United States today is the dramatic rise in overweight and obesity, bringing serious risks of heart disease, diabetes and other consequences leading to life impairment and premature death.  This is bad enough as it is, but I contend that it is particularly unfortunate that we do not sufficiently recognize the extent to which these trends are caused by environmental factors, particularly the shape of our built environment.” - Kaid Benfield, NRDC’s director of sustainable communities.
via obon:

theatlantic:

The Very Real Economic Dangers of an Aging America

In the future, U.S. growth will be slower. Recessions will be deeper. Recoveries will be weaker. And there’s exactly one thing to blame.

Demographics.

That’s the stark conclusion from James Stock and Mark Watson in this fascinating, and occasionally depressing, new paper. In fact, they say, the future is now. For the last few years, we’ve weathered the beginning of what demographers have called the grey tsunami. “Most of the slow recovery [in today’s job market] is attributable to a long-term slowdown in trend employment growth,” Stock and Watson write.

The authors blame two demographic demons for our uncertain future: (1) the plateau in the female labor force participation rate, and (2) the aging of the U.S. workforce. Their underlying logic is that without continued growth in female workers or a significant boost in population, employment and GDP growth will slow, leaving us vulnerable to recessions with “steeper declines and slower recoveries.” In such a future, jobless recoveries will be the only recoveries we know.

Read more. [Image: Peter Bell, Ryan Morris]

Posted at 3:42pm and tagged with: Aging, United States, Econonmy, Charts, infographics, The Atlantic,.

theatlantic:

The Very Real Economic Dangers of an Aging America

In the future, U.S. growth will be slower. Recessions will be deeper. Recoveries will be weaker. And there’s exactly one thing to blame.
Demographics.
That’s the stark conclusion from James Stock and Mark Watson in this fascinating, and occasionally depressing, new paper. In fact, they say, the future is now. For the last few years, we’ve weathered the beginning of what demographers have called the grey tsunami. “Most of the slow recovery [in today’s job market] is attributable to a long-term slowdown in trend employment growth,” Stock and Watson write.
The authors blame two demographic demons for our uncertain future: (1) the plateau in the female labor force participation rate, and (2) the aging of the U.S. workforce. Their underlying logic is that without continued growth in female workers or a significant boost in population, employment and GDP growth will slow, leaving us vulnerable to recessions with “steeper declines and slower recoveries.” In such a future, jobless recoveries will be the only recoveries we know.
Read more. [Image: Peter Bell, Ryan Morris]

theatlantic:

10 Ways to Visualize How Americans Spend Money on Health Care

1) U.S. Against the World: Spending vs. Life Expectancy

We spend much, much more per person than the rest of the world … but we don’t live much longer than some eastern European countries that spend much less than us. As a result, when you plot the United States against similarly advanced countries based on life expectancy and medical spending, we’re all alone on our little island.

Click through for more.

Posted at 9:06am and tagged with: Economy, Politics, Graphs, Charts, Data Visualization, Data, United States, US,.

theatlantic:

10 Ways to Visualize How Americans Spend Money on Health Care

1) U.S. Against the World: Spending vs. Life Expectancy
We spend much, much more per person than the rest of the world … but we don’t live much longer than some eastern European countries that spend much less than us. As a result, when you plot the United States against similarly advanced countries based on life expectancy and medical spending, we’re all alone on our little island.
Click through for more.

How long leaders stay in office in different countries

OMAN’s name is thought to derive from a word meaning “a man residing permanently in the homeland”—but “presiding” might be more apt. Since 1945, the starting point for our analysis, the sultanate has only had two rulers, making it the country with the lowest turnover of leaders in the world. Countries in the Middle East tend to hold on to their leaders longer than anywhere else (a little over eight years on average). Africa comes next at more than seven years. Latin America, cursed for decades by coups, has in a more democratic era maintained its tendency to swap rulers every four years or so. Europeans tire of their leaders quicker than any other region, in part due to a general predominance of prime ministers over presidents, but also to power-sharing arrangements in countries like Switzerland. Our methodology, however, looks at individuals rather than terms, so does not fully account for the variations of revolving-door presidencies like that of Russia under Vladimir Putin.

Posted at 2:32pm and tagged with: Politics, Charts, Data, Infographics, Information,.

How long leaders stay in office in different countries
OMAN’s name is thought to derive from a word meaning “a man residing permanently in the homeland”—but “presiding” might be more apt. Since 1945, the starting point for our analysis, the sultanate has only had two rulers, making it the country with the lowest turnover of leaders in the world. Countries in the Middle East tend to hold on to their leaders longer than anywhere else (a little over eight years on average). Africa comes next at more than seven years. Latin America, cursed for decades by coups, has in a more democratic era maintained its tendency to swap rulers every four years or so. Europeans tire of their leaders quicker than any other region, in part due to a general predominance of prime ministers over presidents, but also to power-sharing arrangements in countries like Switzerland. Our methodology, however, looks at individuals rather than terms, so does not fully account for the variations of revolving-door presidencies like that of Russia under Vladimir Putin.

curiositycounts:

Constitutions of Classic Cocktails – the latest stellar visualization from Pop Chart Lab. Previously: I II III

Posted at 12:56pm and tagged with: Cocktails, Drinks, Mixology, Data Visualization, Charts, Infographics, drhfquinzel,.

curiositycounts:

Constitutions of Classic Cocktails – the latest stellar visualization from Pop Chart Lab. Previously: I II III

theatlantic:

The Fed’s Doom and Gloom Predictions for Our Economy

Federal Reserve officials predicted three bleak years for the U.S. economy, and the Federal Open Market Committee announced today that it intends to keep short-term interest rates extremely low until 2014 amid a pondering economic recovery.

A note on reading the graph above: The dark blue band represents the “central tendency of projections” and the light blue band represents the full range of projections. 

The upshot is that Fed officials believe the economy will hit 3% to 4% yearly growth in the next three years. That’s better than we’re expanding now, but it’s still worse than most recoveries from past recessions. Read more.

Posted at 10:43am and tagged with: Economy, Federal Reserve, Charts, Graphs, Economics, GDP, Federal Open Market Committee, US, United States, Finance, Gross Domestic Product, FOMC,.

theatlantic:

The Fed’s Doom and Gloom Predictions for Our Economy

Federal Reserve officials predicted three bleak years for the U.S. economy, and the Federal Open Market Committee announced today that it intends to keep short-term interest rates extremely low until 2014 amid a pondering economic recovery.
A note on reading the graph above: The dark blue band represents the “central tendency of projections” and the light blue band represents the full range of projections. The upshot is that Fed officials believe the economy will hit 3% to 4% yearly growth in the next three years. That’s better than we’re expanding now, but it’s still worse than most recoveries from past recessions. Read more.